Erin Larson Girolamo of Williston, North Dakota with her horse, Huntified were the All-Around Amateurs at the show. Photo © Gillespie Show Horses

AQHA News from Central Level 1 Championships: End-Of-Show Awards

The 2019 AQHA Central Level 1 Championships concluded a four-day run, with 1,465 entries, 394 horses and 601 stalls. And with the end of the show comes the winners of the all-around and high-point awards.

Congratulations to everyone who exhibited at this year’s show!

All-Around Amateur
Huntified
2006 brown gelding
MDR Impulsified-Diva Diana (TB) by Proud And True
Erin Larson Girolamo, Williston, North Dakota

All-Around Select Amateur
Talldarknchocolate
2009 brown gelding
One Hot Chocolate-Duplicated Rose by Duplicated Deck
Liz Baker-Midtlien, St. Paul, Minnesota

CLICK HERE to see the rest of the winners.

They’re Champion of Champions in Youth Halter

Trinity Bell and A Certain Faith took home the youth halter champion of champions trophy on Day 3 of the 2019 AQHA Central Level 1 Championships.

A Certain Faith and Trinity Bell picked up two more trophies on Friday at the 2019 AQHA Central Level 1 Championships.

Trinity Bell had never shown in a halter class before Day 3 of the 2019 AQHA Central Level 1 Championships. But it didn’t seem to bother her. She treated it just like showmanship and showed her 13-year-old mare, A Certain Faith, to the best of her ability.

They took home the win in aged mares and then won the youth champion of champions title.

It was a cap on a really good Level 1 Championships first experience for the 8-year-old from Weatherford, Texas.

Read more about Trinity and “Faith” in this story we posted on Thursday.

A Very Good Place to Start

It doesn’t matter if you’re a kid or and adult, riding a green horse or a seasoned pro, AQHA walk-trot classes are a good place to start.

Misty Hobbs of Canyon, Texas, and her 5-year-old mare, Ask My Age, won walk-trot amateur hunt seat equitation at the 2019 AQHA Central Level 1 Championships this week in Oklahoma City.

When it comes to AQHA walk-trot classes, it’s not so much the ages of the exhibitors and horses that matter; it’s more about their experience and confidence levels.

Take, for example, Misty Hobbs of Canyon, Texas, who has been around horses most of her life, but is breaking new ground with a green mare she bought a year ago.

A few years ago, Misty decided she needed to start looking for a successor to her elderly race-bred gelding. Then when her gelding died unexpectedly, Misty’s search took on a little more urgency. She really wanted another gelding.

“I had a friend, who said, ‘Hey, I’ve got this 2-year-old mare and …’ and I said, ‘No, no. I don’t want a mare and I don’t want a 2-year-old,’ ” Misty said. “We met up again at the (AQHA Central Level 1 Championships) the next year, and she said, ‘I’ve still got that mare; she’s really cute.’ I just couldn’t do it … I just didn’t want a mare. I looked for several months, but just never got that warm, fuzzy feeling for any of the horses I tried. So, because I knew this friend had good horses, I gave in and went to look at her mare.”

CLICK HERE to read the rest of the article from The American Quarter Horse Journal

A Match Made at the Barn

Hannah Hipps has had a good spring horse show season, and it all started with a borrowed horse named Huntin Forever.

Huntin Forever with Hannah Hipps, Stephanie Wessels and trainer Patty Campbell.

“I just started riding him this spring,” Hannah said of the 2010 bay gelding she’s showing this week at the AQHA Central Level 1 Championships in Oklahoma City. “A friend of ours – Pat Clements – who also shows with (trainer) Patty Campbell, owns ‘Tino,’ and she gave me the opportunity to show him. We just really clicked and we just decided to go to the Level 1 Championships.”

Tino, who is by Hubba Hubba Huntin and out of Forever And Only by Invitation Only, is owned by Patricia Clements of Dallas, who shows him in Select trail.

Hannah and Tino got a running start at the Central Level 1 by first showing at the Oklahoma Quarter Horse Association Spring Show.

CLICK HERE to read the rest of the article.

 

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